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Below are the 20 most recent journal entries recorded in Constructing Languages DE-Cal's LiveJournal:

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    Monday, May 22nd, 2006
    5:25 pm
    [tubahobbit]
    My language is posted on the Conlangs page... now with cuts so as to stop annoying people! :-D I posted it late on Thursday night. If anyone can tell me how to get the IPA symbols to look right, I'd appreciate it though.
    Thursday, May 18th, 2006
    9:59 pm
    [dandanaz]
    A Short Introduction to hPeiput

    An Introduction to huPeiput

     

    Phonetics

     

    The phonetic inventory of huPeiput can be divided into three broad groups of phonemes – main consonants, auxiliary consonants, and vowels – each of which function differently in the language.  Perhaps the most distinguishing feature of huPeiput is the intimate link between its phonemes and its syntax and morphology.

     

     

    Main Consonants all fall within three consonant families: the p family, the k family, and the t family.  In principle, each family consists of one of these unvoiced plosives along with its voiced plosive, unvoiced fricative, voiced fricative, and voiced nasal counterparts.  Note, however, that this grouping has been tweaked a bit for aesthetic purposes, so in several places it does not fall in perfect accordance with formal phonology.

    Main consonant grouping is a crucial aspect of huPeiput syntax.  Different consonants in the same family are never lexically contrastive, but they are syntactically contrastive.  For example, changing a p to a b will not change the meaning of a word, but it will change the function of that word in its sentence.  Specifically, voicing/stopping/nasality of main consonants serve to indicate whether a word is a subject, verb, direct object, indirect object, or modifier.  (This will be clearer later.)

     

    Subject            Verb                Direct Object              Indirect Object              Modifier     

    p                      b                                  f                                   v                                  m

    k                      g                                  x                                  G                                 N

    t                       d                                  T                                  D                                 n

     

    These family relations are distinctly represented in huPeiput’s orthography (which, owing to my unfortunate computer skills, does not yet exist anywhere outside my notebook).  That is, for these 15 phonemes there are only three basic symbols – one per family.  Symbols within the family are distinguished only by diacritical marks – a horizontal underline for voicing, a vertical slash for fricatives, and a sort of umlaut for nasals.

     

     

    Auxiliary Consonants are those that do not affect the syntax of the language, but they do have morphological functions.  The consonants

    s                                  z                                   S                                  Z

    are used to indicate such things as word senses and agency versus subjecthood.  For example, these consonants can be added to a word to distinguish a metaphorical or figurative use from a literal one.  Similarly applied, the sounds      r        and      l

    govern verbal tense and aspect.

     

     

    Vowels are a much simpler matter in huPeiput, and their roles and behavior in the language are nothing that would be unfamiliar to English speakers.  There is no necessary classification among vowels, and any two distinct vowels are always lexically contrastive.  Vowels are the backbone of every lexeme, as they are its only components that never change.  HuPeiput words commonly use the monophthongs

    u                                  i                                   o

    as well as the diphthongs      ei    and        ai.   Each of these vowels (as well as the @ sound, which is less commonly used) has its own orthographic character and is almost always pronounced the same way regardless of context.  The only exception is that the two diphthongs may be shortened to e and a when they appear in word affixes, but never within the word itself.  

     

    HuPeiput also uses the glottal fricative h in all articles (such as the hu in huPeiput), but rather than a consonantal phoneme it is regarded as a feature of the vowel it precedes.  Orthographically, for example, hu is recorded like the sound u but with a diacritical to mark aspiration.

     

     

    The base of every word, regardless of its part of speech, is of the form CVCVC (let C refer specifically to main consonants, and c stand for auxiliaries).  Auxiliary consonants can be inserted in certain places, namely C[c]V[c]C[c]V[c]C, where brackets represent a place of permissible insertion.  For certain verbal moods, an extra VC segment can be added in the middle to the effect that it forms a “parabolic” syllable – so patuk could be made into p@paituk, pait@tuk, or paituk@k.  This is to maintain an important rule that every word must have exactly three main consonants.  Words can be augmented on the outside only in two cases.  Where appropriate, articles appear as aspirated vowels at the beginnings of words, making them (h)VCVCVC.  Number is expressed in various suffixes, all of the form VcV, so when number is indicated a word can take on the form CVCVCVcV.

    The inflection of the main consonants within words presents all one needs to know about huPeiput syntax. 

     

    Sample Phrases

    haxeitip giTaig bodud hukitsaik.  hopaipug dod@deig.

    (5art.+[DSS]glass) ([VDV]eat)  ([VVV]can) (1art.+[SS{s}S]eat{thing that eats}).  (3art.+[SSV]action) ([VV{@V}V]harm{negated}).

    “This eater can eat glass.  That action does not harm.”

    “I can eat glass.  It does not hurt me.”

     

    huvaiDuGzuru.

    (1art.+[III]hand+{ordinal}one)

    “(To/from/by/etc.)[like a dative case] this right hand.”

    Hello.”

     

    huvaiDuGziri.

    (1art.+[III]hand+{ordinal}two)

    “(To/from/by/etc.)[like dative case] this left hand.”

    “Goodbye.”

     

    huGeiviDiri.

    (3art.+[III]knee+two)

    “(To/from/by/etc.)[like dative case] these knees.”

    “Thank you.”

     

    higaixit dodeik!

    (2art.+[VDS]heart) ([VVS]harm)

    “For that (addressed) heart to be harmed [whole phrase is infinitive]!”

    “Fuck you!”

     

    hopotsaitala piNeitsuru bodlaid fiNeiTsuru.

    (3art.+[SSS]be-true[thing that is true]+<10) ([SMS]finger+{ordinal}one)

    ([VV{l}V]be-true{cause to be true}) ([DMD]finger+{ordinal}one)

    “Those true-things, on the first finger, make-true the first finger.”

    “Those truths make themselves true.”

    “We hold these truths to be self-evident.”

    9:51 pm
    [dandanaz]
    An Introduction to huPeiput

    Phonetics

    The phonetic inventory of huPeiput can be divided into three broad groups of phonemes – main consonants, auxiliary consonants, and vowels – each of which function differently in the language. Perhaps the most distinguishing feature of huPeiput is the intimate link between its phonemes and its syntax and morphology.


    Main Consonants all fall within three consonant families: the p family, the k family, and the t family. In principle, each family consists of one of these unvoiced plosives along with its voiced plosive, unvoiced fricative, voiced fricative, and voiced nasal counterparts. Note, however, that this grouping has been tweaked a bit for aesthetic purposes, so in several places it does not fall in perfect accordance with formal phonology.
    Main consonant grouping is a crucial aspect of huPeiput syntax. Different consonants in the same family are never lexically contrastive, but they are syntactically contrastive. For example, changing a p to a b will not change the meaning of a word, but it will change the function of that word in its sentence. Specifically, voicing/stopping/nasality of main consonants serve to indicate whether a word is a subject, verb, direct object, indirect object, or modifier. (This will be clearer later.)

    Subject                  Verb          Direct Object                  Indirect Object                 Modifier
    p                                b                       f                                           v                                m
    k                                g                       x                                          G                                N
    t                                 d                       T                                         D                                 n

    These family relations are distinctly represented in huPeiput’s orthography (which, owing to my unfortunate computer skills, does not yet exist anywhere outside my notebook). That is, for these 15 phonemes there are only three basic symbols – one per family. Symbols within the family are distinguished only by diacritical marks – a horizontal underline for voicing, a vertical slash for fricatives, and a sort of umlaut for nasals.


    Auxiliary Consonants are those that do not affect the syntax of the language, but they do have morphological functions. The consonants
               s                 z                           S                Z
    are used to indicate such things as word senses and agency versus subjecthood. For example, these consonants can be added to a word to distinguish a metaphorical or figurative use from a literal one. Similarly applied, the sounds r and l
    govern verbal tense and aspect.


    Vowels are a much simpler matter in huPeiput, and their roles and behavior in the language are nothing that would be unfamiliar to English speakers. There is no necessary classification among vowels, and any two distinct vowels are always lexically contrastive. Vowels are the backbone of every lexeme, as they are its only components that never change. HuPeiput words commonly use the monophthongs
    u i o
    as well as the diphthongs ei and ai. Each of these vowels (as well as the @ sound, which is less commonly used) has its own orthographic character and is almost always pronounced the same way regardless of context. The only exception is that the two diphthongs may be shortened to e and a when they appear in word affixes, but never within the word itself.

    HuPeiput also uses the glottal fricative h in all articles (such as the hu in huPeiput), but rather than a consonantal phoneme it is regarded as a feature of the vowel it precedes. Orthographically, for example, hu is recorded like the sound u but with a diacritical to mark aspiration.


    The base of every word, regardless of its part of speech, is of the form CVCVC (let C refer specifically to main consonants, and c stand for auxiliaries). Auxiliary consonants can be inserted in certain places, namely C[c]V[c]C[c]V[c]C, where brackets represent a place of permissible insertion. For certain verbal moods, an extra VC segment can be added in the middle to the effect that it forms a “parabolic” syllable – so patuk could be made into p@paituk, pait@tuk, or paituk@k. This is to maintain an important rule that every word must have exactly three main consonants. Words can be augmented on the outside only in two cases. Where appropriate, articles appear as aspirated vowels at the beginnings of words, making them (h)VCVCVC. Number is expressed in various suffixes, all of the form VcV, so when number is indicated a word can take on the form CVCVCVcV.

    The inflection of the main consonants within words presents all one needs to know about huPeiput syntax.

    Sample Phrases
    haxeitip giTaig bodud hukitsaik. hopaipug dod@deig.
    (5art.+[DSS]glass) ([VDV]eat) ([VVV]can) (1art.+[SS{s}S]eat{thing that eats}). (3art.+[SSV]action) ([VV{@V}V]harm{negated}).
    “This eater can eat glass. That action does not harm.”
    “I can eat glass. It does not hurt me.”

    huvaiDuGzuru.
    (1art.+[III]hand+{ordinal}one)
    “(To/from/by/etc.)[like a dative case] this right hand.”
    “Hello.”

    huvaiDuGziri.
    (1art.+[III]hand+{ordinal}two)
    “(To/from/by/etc.)[like dative case] this left hand.”
    “Goodbye.”

    huGeiviDiri.
    (3art.+[III]knee+two)
    “(To/from/by/etc.)[like dative case] these knees.”
    “Thank you.”

    higaixit dodeik!
    (2art.+[VDS]heart) ([VVS]harm)
    “For that (addressed) heart to be harmed [whole phrase is infinitive]!”
    “Fuck you!”

    hopotsaitala piNeitsuru bodlaid fiNeiTsuru.
    (3art.+[SSS]be-true[thing that is true]+<10) ([SMS]finger+{ordinal}one)
    ([VV{l}V]be-true{cause to be true}) ([DMD]finger+{ordinal}one)
    “Those true-things, on the first finger, make-true the first finger.”
    “Those truths make themselves true.”
    “We hold these truths to be self-evident.”
    Monday, May 22nd, 2006
    9:37 pm
    [saizai]
    Class language so far
    Code name: Scratch - [skr&t_S]

    Babel 1

    krɛʃ ðɛʙrik krɛt͡s çikθamut ʒik t͡ʃæɣeʃ qɯ ðræk
    kɹɛʃ ðɛʙik krɛt͡s çikθamut ʒik t͡ʃæɣeʃ qɯ ðɹæk.

    krES DEB\rik krEt_s CikTamut Zik t_S&GeS qM Dr&k
    kr\ES DEB\ik krEt_s CikTamut Zik t_S&GeS qM Dr\&k.
    long-ago inhabited-place in-all people next-to language 1-EMPH CLASS(lang)
    Long ago, people everywhere had ONE language.

    Babel 2a

    ɯp̚ loːj tæʙɹ̩ riuʘɫ̩ t͡ʃakɛʃ d͡ʒaɹ
    ɯp loːj tæʙ-ɹ̩ riuʘ-ɫ̩ t͡ʃakɛʃ d͡ʒaɹ.

    Mp_} lo:j t&B\r\= riuO\5= t_SakES d_Zar\
    Mp lo:j t&B\-r\= riuO\-5= t_SakES d_Zar\.
    sometime-later Lo!-EMPH 3-pl-far-anim-ERG mountain-ABS moonrise push-NONDIR
    And then, LO!, Moonrise Mountain pushed out / scattered (the) people.

    Babel 2b

    tæʙɹ̩ ʃɪnaɹɫ̩ təm qir
    tæʙ-ɹ̩ ʃɪnaɹ-ɫ̩ təm qir.

    t&B\r\= SInar\5= t@m qir
    t&B\-r\= SInar\-5= t@m qir.
    3-pl-far-anim-ERG Shinar-ABS CLASS(flat & wide) pull-DIR
    Shinar pulled the people towards itself.

    Babel 2c

    tɔsɹ̩ tæʙɫ̩ ðɛt͡s
    tɔs-ɹ̩ tæʙ-ɫ̩ ðɛt͡s.

    tOsr\= t&B5= DEt_s
    tOs-r\= t&B-5= DEt_s.
    3-sg-far-inanim-ERG 3-pl-far-anim-ABS inhabit
    They inhabited it.


    Syntax:
    S := (TIME) Obj-ERG Subj-ABS Verb
    S := (TIME) LocP NP
    ERG := -r\=
    ABS := -5=
    LocP := AdvP Obj LocArticle
    NP := #P
    NP := N CLASS (semi-adjectival use)
    NP := N Adj
    #P := N_a # CLASS_a

    Unusual vocab:
    push: q&r (directional) / d_Zar\ (non-directional)
    pull: qir (dir) / d_Zur\ (non-dir)
    - "directional" vs not as in gunshot or grab-and-pull vs. explosion or spherical magnet

    Pronouns are in form: CVC
    first C = person
    1st p
    2nd k
    3rd t

    second C = #
    1(sg) s
    2(dl) T
    3(tr) D
    4+(pl) B\

    vowel height = psychological/physical distance (high = close / low = far)
    - exception: for 1st person dl/tr/pl, near = inclusive-"we" and far = exclusive-"we"

    vowel backness = animacy (front = animate / back = inanimate)


    Classifiers:
    t@m - flat, wide things
    Dr\&k - languages, cultures, etc


    Approx. phonemic inventory:
    Vowels: eʲ ɪ i ɛ æ u ə a
    e_j I i E & u @ a
    Consonants: ç ɣ {ɹ r} {ʙ ʘ} m k q ʃ ʒ θ ð t͡s t͡ʃ
    C G {r\ r} {B O\} m k q S Z T D t_s t_S
    - {A B C D} indicates a phoneme, with A the prime and B... the variants

    Phonotactic: (C)(C)V(C), unspecified restrictions on the onset cluster; continuants

    allowed as syllabic nuclei

    Sound change rules:
    /r\/ -> [r] / _ V
    /B\/ -> [O\] / _ #
    / / -> [r] / B_V
    /vl stop/ -> [vl stop_}] / _ EMPH <- semantically-conditioned!

    Example sentence: ræ kra çɛʃ. t͡suk ʙ kiɹ t͡sɛʘ t͡ʃiʘ ðɪʃkaɹ kçiç krɛ t͡sut͡s.
    r& kra CES. t_suk B\ kir/ t_sEO\ t_SiO\ DISkar\ kCiC krE t_sut_s.

    Approx. translation: AAAAH! DRAGON!

    Meanings:
    B - exclamation / morpheme (?); indicates surprise or emphasis of some kind; emphasizes

    previous word
    t_SiO\ - dragon
    DISkar - a particular dragon named [DISkar]
    Tuesday, February 28th, 2006
    9:04 pm
    [saizai]
    Wednesday, February 15th, 2006
    11:20 pm
    [saizai]
    Class #3 videos will be delayed
    Bag didn't have the USB cable I need to rip 'em. Will have to wait until the weekend to borrow the camera again (with cables). Takes a couple days after rip to process, upload, and get approved.
    Monday, February 13th, 2006
    10:58 am
    [saizai]
    Class #2 online

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2918949224011108416
    http://www.archive.org/details/Conlangs06-2-full

    Take your pick. Delay 'cause Google took since Thursday to approve it. :-/

    I don't think this class went very well (very... slow, not much response, just enh overall vs last class), so per usual (maybe more so), requesting suggestions for improvement / comments / etc.

    Enjoy.

     - Sai

    Wednesday, February 8th, 2006
    2:33 am
    [saizai]
    Class #1 - on archive.org too now
    http://www.archive.org/details/Conlangs06-1-full

    Future episodes will be under the same series (i.e.http://www.archive.org/details/Conlangs06-2-full etc.) - or just keyword search 'conlangs'.

    The only format I uploaded is the original .wmv rip (~350MB, 720x480 NTSC). I tried reencoding to DivX and actually got a much higher file size... so unless someone specifically can use neither this NOR the Google video one (flash based), that's all I'm going to bother with.

    Enjoy.
    Friday, February 3rd, 2006
    5:40 pm
    [saizai]
    Class 1 now live
    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8521362586103656261

    In general, video.google.com -> keyword 'conlangs 06'.

    Go watch it if you weren't there for the original.
    Wednesday, February 1st, 2006
    10:05 pm
    [saizai]
    Class 1 writings
    Code name: Scratch - [skr&t_S]

    Phonetic inventory so far (in Conlangs-extended X-Sampa):
    Vowels: e_j I i E & u @ a
    Consonants: C G {r\ r} {B O\} m k q S Z T D t_s t_S
    - {A B C D} indicates a phoneme, with A the prime and B... the variants

    Phonotactic: (C)(C)V(C), unspecified restrictions on the onset cluster

    Sound change rules:
    /r\/ -> [r] / _ V
    /B/ -> [O\] / _ #

    Example sentence:
    r& kra CES. t_suk B kir/ t_sEO\ t_SiO\ DISkar\ kCiC krE t_sut_s.

    Meanings:
    B - exclamation / morpheme (?); indicates surprise or emphasis of some kind; emphasizes previous word
    t_SiO\ - dragon
    TISkar - a particular dragon named [TISkar]
    10:04 pm
    [saizai]
    First off: The class will be from now on W 4-6, in 204 Wheeler (not Dwinelle).

    Second: If you haven't yet, please create a livejournal account and use it to fill out the 'prior experience' poll. I use it to try to tailor how I explain things, and as a comparison point for once the semester ends (and you can re-rate yourselves and see what changed). The URL is http://www.livejournal.com/~conlangs (though you need to log in on the main livejournal site first).

    I would recommend that those of you thinking of taking the class for two units (and for that matter, the rest of you too) work on your phonetic inventory, phonology, phonotactics, and post it to the LJ community. You can of course post works-in-progress, questions, possibilities that you later end up revising, etc; the point is just to get *something* down, and get input from peers. If you're trying to aim for a particular effect (e.g. auxiliary language, a particular aesthetic 'feel', etc. etc.) let us know.

    I am currently ripping the video taken of today's class, and will try to re-rip the last three days of last year's class (saved 'cause I still have the tapes) before next Monday. I will post them on Google Video and perhaps archive.org as well; I will post a link on livejournal. (Or in any case, you can find them by searching those two sites for the keyword 'conlangs'.)

    If you weren't there today, or missed part of class, watch it.

    I am adding everyone who was in class today and wrote down their LJ name as members of the LJ community; that's the only way to get in though. If you were there today and haven't yet made a username, email me to tell me what it is and I'll add you. If you weren't, come next time having made an account and tell me then.

    The reader is attached again, in case you didn't get it last time. I strongly recommend you print out the IPA chart; the rest is at your discretion.

    If you want a fully printed version, just go to the nearest copyshop (I'd recommend the one in Sather Lane - the little alley next to Ned's), open your mail, and print the document. It is ready to be printed (has appropriate page numbering, odd-page-breaks, etc; you just print it and ask 'em to bind it for you.

    I'm going to ask for a couple volunteers to help me with a few things.

    First, note-taking. I don't want to take the time out to write everything down on paper for myself that I write on the board - I'd like one (or better, two) of you to be the 'official note-taker' for the class. That just means making sure that you have a record of whatever we did that got written down (or was Decided), and maybe posting a short version of it to the LJ community from time to time.

    Second, videography. When we move to the regular room, we'll probably be sitting in a horseshoe facing a board - it's useful to have someone operating the camera so that the writing gets captured clearly, or to get people (other than me) who are talking. This needn't be the same person every time of course.

    Lastly, the Language Creation Society - a new student group I created - needs one more student signatory. We'll be planning (and holding) a conlangs symposium / conference in April/Mayish. Being a signatory is really easy - you just fill out two forms online, and make sure that you're fully registered as far as UC is concerned. Let me know if you're willing to help with that, or with the process of arranging the conference.

    I think that covers everything. See you all next time - when we do some more translation of 'Sketch', and perhaps work on a writing system...
    Wednesday, January 25th, 2006
    7:53 pm
    [saizai]
    First meeting - room
    1229 Dwinelle

    That's in the 'faculty ghetto' basement, floor A - go around Dwinelle to the back-right (west) side.

    See you there, W 2/1 at 4pm.
    Tuesday, January 24th, 2006
    10:08 pm
    [saizai]
    One more availability poll
    Poll #659513 M/W eves

    I am available:

    M 4-5
    0(0.0%)
    M 5-6
    0(0.0%)
    M 6-7
    0(0.0%)
    W 4-5
    0(0.0%)
    W 5-6
    0(0.0%)
    W 6-7
    0(0.0%)
    none of the above
    0(0.0%)
    Monday, January 23rd, 2006
    7:39 pm
    [saizai]
    FIRST CLASS

    The first conlangs class of this semester will be WEDNESDAY OF NEXT WEEK (February 1st), 4-6.

    Right now, the breakdown of who can attend what time slots is pretty sloppy, alas. What that means is, the timeslot with the most people in it is W 4-5 (16 people), followed by M 4-5 (14).

    So: if you at all can, come on Wednesday sometime between 4 to 6. We will resolve the question of what the ongoing schedule will be, then. FWIW, I currently have sections MW3-4; I may change those around though. We'll see.

    I can't actually reserve a room yet, so stand by for further anouncement about where it will be.

    VOTE in the new poll to tell me what times you are available.

    Also - I may need someone reliable to pick up the camera from downstairs Dwinelle before class (given how tight my schedule is). Any volunteers?

    The current layout of names vs timeslotsCollapse )

    Wednesday, January 18th, 2006
    7:36 pm
    [saizai]
    Signups count
    I've been keeping track of how many people have signed up (on the class-times poll), by date & # of hits on the www.decal.org/conlangs website. Probably only of interest to me, but here it is - I'll update this occasionally.

    I wonder if people will keep signing up that rate... 'twould certainly be interesting. I also intend to do some tabling on Sproul (for this & ucb_lcs), probably sometime next week or so; we'll see how that affects things. I don't think DE-Cals have been known to table much; I've seen a few doing flyering though. Will also try to pitch the class during Ling 1 / 100 / 105, sometime soon.

    I should probably start figuring out how (if at all) I'm going to have to change my style to work with a larger class - last year's was a half-dozen students or so, and I'd like to preserve that sort of actual *discussion* feel even if the number of people goes up. We'll see. It'll probably get worked out over the first couple classes.

    In case you"re curiousCollapse )
    Tuesday, January 17th, 2006
    7:45 pm
    [saizai]
    Classroom; status updates
    Well, that was a jump in signups today (14 to 19)... figures. I wonder how much it'll go up over the next couple weeks...

    I talked to the department people today. I have CCNs now (for 98 and 198). They made a mistake and listed as 2 unit only (vs 1-2),  but that should be corrected at some point in the next few weeks. (They're not very fast about these things...) If you need the CCNs now, contact me and give me a good reason; otherwise, I'll be passing 'em out during the first class (in 1st week February).

    I'm effectively locked out of scheduling a classroom for about three weeks; until then it'll have to be guerilla-style. Which is fine, 'cause I really don't know how large a class this will be, nor when exactly the best time will be yet. (Looking like M/W late afternoon though, so far.)

    Translation: the first couple classes will probably be a bit erratic about location (and possibly even outdoors).

    I can check out A/V equipment though, and will be in the process of re-ripping the last three videos from last year's class over the next few days. They were lost in a hard drive failure. I'm not sure of the dates of them, but it should give a better idea of what we did towards the end of the class last year, and what worked then is really what I'm basing a lot of this year on. I found it more successful than the lecture-style stuff I did in the beginning.

    (Er, that reminds me: I will be videotaping all the classes again this year unless there are major cogent objections. If you don't want to be on camera, that can be arranged - just let me know [we'll just sit you behind the camera - perhaps as operator?]. It's really not a big deal and you get used to it within a class or two. And hey, we're recording for conlang posterity!)
    Tuesday, December 27th, 2005
    3:49 am
    [saizai]
    [Poll] Pre-class experience / understanding
    Poll #640733 Pre-class experience / understanding

    How many human languages do you know? (Conlang or natural, major dialects included; well enough to converse on most basic topics.)

    Mean: 2.08 Median: 2 Std. Dev 0.83
    1
    4(30.8%)
    2
    4(30.8%)
    3
    5(38.5%)
    4
    0(0.0%)
    5
    0(0.0%)
    6
    0(0.0%)
    7
    0(0.0%)
    8
    0(0.0%)
    9
    0(0.0%)
    10
    0(0.0%)

    How well do you think you know basic linguistics theory? (Phonetics through syntax.)

    Mean: 4.00 Median: 4 Std. Dev 2.04
    1
    3(23.1%)
    2
    1(7.7%)
    3
    0(0.0%)
    4
    3(23.1%)
    5
    2(15.4%)
    6
    3(23.1%)
    7
    1(7.7%)
    8
    0(0.0%)
    9
    0(0.0%)
    10
    0(0.0%)

    ... formal syntax for witing phonetics, derivational structures, etc.? (IPA, CXS, tree structure, S := NP VP, etc)

    Mean: 2.62 Median: 2 Std. Dev 1.90
    1
    5(38.5%)
    2
    3(23.1%)
    3
    2(15.4%)
    4
    1(7.7%)
    5
    0(0.0%)
    6
    1(7.7%)
    7
    1(7.7%)
    8
    0(0.0%)
    9
    0(0.0%)
    10
    0(0.0%)

    ... conlanging in general? (History, culture, types, motivations)

    Mean: 2.69 Median: 2 Std. Dev 2.33
    1
    6(46.2%)
    2
    2(15.4%)
    3
    2(15.4%)
    4
    1(7.7%)
    5
    0(0.0%)
    6
    1(7.7%)
    7
    0(0.0%)
    8
    0(0.0%)
    9
    1(7.7%)
    10
    0(0.0%)

    ... specific conlangs? (I.e., fluency in any conlang(s) of your choice)

    Mean: 1.17 Median: 1 Std. Dev 0.37
    1
    10(83.3%)
    2
    2(16.7%)
    3
    0(0.0%)
    4
    0(0.0%)
    5
    0(0.0%)
    6
    0(0.0%)
    7
    0(0.0%)
    8
    0(0.0%)
    9
    0(0.0%)
    10
    0(0.0%)

    ... theoretical issues of conlang design?

    Mean: 2.38 Median: 1 Std. Dev 1.86
    1
    7(53.8%)
    2
    1(7.7%)
    3
    2(15.4%)
    4
    1(7.7%)
    5
    1(7.7%)
    6
    0(0.0%)
    7
    1(7.7%)
    8
    0(0.0%)
    9
    0(0.0%)
    10
    0(0.0%)

    Elaborate / anything else?

    Mean: 2.36 Median: 1 Std. Dev 2.10
    1
    7(63.6%)
    2
    1(9.1%)
    3
    0(0.0%)
    4
    0(0.0%)
    5
    2(18.2%)
    6
    0(0.0%)
    7
    1(9.1%)
    8
    0(0.0%)
    9
    0(0.0%)
    10
    0(0.0%)

    Will you want a printed copy of the class reader? (Assume that you will get a .doc copy of it which you could print yourself if you wanted, and that the price of a printed reader will be in the normal range for something that's 326 pages, i.e. ~$15-25.)

    Yes
    2(15.4%)
    Maybe
    4(30.8%)
    No
    7(53.8%)
    Saturday, December 24th, 2005
    1:14 am
    [saizai]
    UCB Language Creation Society
    ucb_lcs

    New student group, adjunct to conlangs_decal.

    Is pretty much what it says it is. Open to anyone interested, not just the UCB-affiliated.

    Let me know if you're interested.
    Sunday, December 11th, 2005
    11:43 pm
    [saizai]
    Conlangs DE-Cal, Spring 2006 - Approved
    Official Synopsis:

    Constructed languages (conlangs) - a.k.a. "artificial languages", etc - include a wide variety of languages. Esperanto, Klingon, Quenya, Loglan / Lojban, Signed Exact English, proto-Indo-European, and many many others are all conlangs. Arguably, this list includes Received English, Korean, and Turkish as well.

    This class will be about designing your own language, mostly from the bottom up. We will work on a class language together, using ideas from various students, as you create (or continue to work on) your own languages at home (and discuss them in class). The class will not cover the history or theory of conlangs, nor formal linguistics, except as necessary. The main focus will be on actually getting “into it” – starting from day one – and learning what you need as you go.

    If you are interested in these more in-depth topics, talk to me. There is plenty of material available, including some videos from the previous year’s class, and books in the library.

    No linguistic background is necessary for this class, though it will certainly be useful. Likewise, reading through the reader will be very useful (especially for those new to conlanging), as will be reading the recommended text, though these are both optional.

    This class will be run in a manner fairly different from last year’s Conlangs DE-Cal – less intense, and more hands-on. Last year’s was closer in scope to a full Ling 1 or Ling 101 class.

    Returning students MAY take this class for credit again, but will need to do a new final project, or an expansion to their previous year’s. Talk to me if this applies to you.

    Timing:

    This class will generally meet two hours a week. If the enrollment of students interested in taking 2 units is too low, then this will be reduced to one hour a week.

    On a side note: I am graduating in May, and obviously won’t be around to teach the class any more after that. If you are interested in taking over from me, please let me know.

    If you have knowledge of linguistics or conlangs, you are very much welcome to teach some of the classes in my stead – using my notes if you like (and can decipher them).

    Grading:

    This is a variable-unit, pass / no pass class. There is no difference between the 98 and 198 versions; choose whichever you prefer.

    To get 1 unit: Show up most of the time – enough for me to know your name when they ask me whether or not you passed. That’s it.

    To get 2 units: Attend class regularly, and do the final project (which you’ll be doing the work for over the course of the semester anyway) at a level that shows effort. Again: simple.


    IF you are interested in taking the class, please fill out the poll below so I can decide on a good time slot etc. Thanks.
    Poll #631985 Class times etc

    How interested are you in the class material?

    Mean: 4.28 Median: 4 Std. Dev 0.71
    1
    0(0.0%)
    2
    1(2.6%)
    3
    3(7.7%)
    4
    19(48.7%)
    5
    16(41.0%)

    How likely are you to take the class, if it's offered at a time you're available?

    Mean: 4.44 Median: 5 Std. Dev 0.63
    1
    0(0.0%)
    2
    0(0.0%)
    3
    3(7.7%)
    4
    16(41.0%)
    5
    20(51.3%)

    For how many units?

    Mean: 1.41 Median: 1 Std. Dev 0.59
    0
    2(5.1%)
    1
    19(48.7%)
    2
    18(46.2%)

    Which days could you come? (Would only be 1 or 2, but check all you could.)

    Monday
    1(2.6%)
    Tuesday
    0(0.0%)
    Wednesday
    7(17.9%)
    Thursday
    1(2.6%)
    Friday
    0(0.0%)

    What times could you come, on those days? (If it's different for different days, indicate all and tell me the details.)

    12-1
    1(2.6%)
    1-2
    0(0.0%)
    2-3
    1(2.6%)
    3-4
    3(7.7%)
    4-5
    9(23.1%)

    Would you prefer two one hour sessions, or one two-hour session, per week? (1 = 2x1hr; 5 = 1x2hr; 3 = both are OK.)

    Mean: 3.82 Median: 5 Std. Dev 1.58
    1
    8(20.5%)
    2
    0(0.0%)
    3
    5(12.8%)
    4
    4(10.3%)
    5
    22(56.4%)
    Thursday, November 24th, 2005
    8:20 pm
    [saizai]
    Conlangs DE-Cal '05 videos: now on Google
    http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=conlangs

    All the ones I have have been uploaded. There are some technical issues on their end; only 6 of the 14 are showing up on the search right now. That should get fixed eventually.

    This is in addition to the upload that is still on archive.org, but these are more user-friendly: you can watch them in your browser without having to download the whole thing, at about the same quality. Enjoy.
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